Latest News

30 Nov Native American Heritage Month

Join data2insight as we tune into the free webinar on Thursday, December 17, 2020 for the Youth in Action: Conversations about Our Future - (Re)Telling the American Story. The webinar, sponsored by the American Indian Museum, will be an online zoom webinar, free to all. Details:  The American story has been profoundly shaped by Native Americans, yet the stories told about Native people are often false and almost always incomplete. From Pocahontas and Jamestown to the first Thanksgiving and Plymouth Colony, Indigenous peoples have rarely been the narrators of their own stories. Join us in a conversation with Abigail Peters (Mashpee and Aquinnah Wampanoag/Mi’kmaq), Gisselle Jiménez (Taíno), and Connor Tupponce (Upper Mattaponi/Chickahominy) and learn how Native youth are actively reshaping these narratives today. Learn more about the panelists here....

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23 Nov Honoring Native People on Thanksgiving

November is National Native American Heritage Month, offering many opportunities to move past one-dimensional representations of “pilgrims and Indians.” In the spirit of unity, we can instead focus Thanksgiving on common values:  generosity, gratitude, and community. Most people do not know about the first Thanksgiving is that the Wampanoag and Pilgrims did not sit down for a big turkey dinner and it was not an event that the Wampanoag knew about or were invited to in advance. (source) In September/October 1621, the Pilgrims had just harvested their first crops, and they had a good yield. They “sent four men on fowling,” which comes from...

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16 Nov Celebrating Native American Heritage Month!

What started at the turn of the century as an effort to gain a day of recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S., has resulted in a whole month being designated for that purpose. (source) November is Native American Heritage Month, which was first declared by President George H.W. Bush in 1990. The month provides an opportunity to commemorate the rich and diverse cultures, traditions and histories and acknowledge the important contributions of Native American/Indigenous people. It is also an important time to educate the general public, as well as young people in schools, about the bias, discrimination and unique challenges faced by Native American/Indigenous people both historically and currently and the ways in which they have confronted these challenges. (source) Celebrate the history, culture, and traditions of American Indians and Alaska Natives in a special collection of films, short stories, and resources from Public Television.  Check out the PBS documentary here. Want  more resources?  Check out this site! Join data2insight as we celebrate Native American Heritage Month....

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02 Nov Vote!!

Today, most American citizens over the age of 18 are entitled to vote in federal and state elections, but voting was not always a default right for all Americans. While no longer explicitly excluded, voter suppression is a problem in many parts of the country. (source) If you ever think that just one vote in a sea of millions cannot make much of a difference, consider some of the closest elections in U.S. history.  Your vote may not directly elect the president, but if your vote joins enough others in your voting district or county, your vote undoubtedly matters when it comes to electoral results. (source) If you experience problems voting, report it here. Voter intimidation has no place in a fair election. See Something, Say Something (See Say 2020) converts citizen reported instances of voter suppression into real time maps and alerts.  Learn more at the Democracy Labs. Prepare and prevent a disrupted presidential election and transition  https://choosedemocracy.us/ Learn more from this article and this video. Join data2insight as we exercise our right to vote!  ...

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26 Oct Halloween 2020!

With the convergence of a full moon, a blue moon, daylight saving time and Saturday celebrations — plus the unprecedented events of this year — Halloween 2020 will truly be one to remember. Much has changed … but our love for the fun, fright, and delight of Halloween is strong as ever. So let’s unleash our Halloween inspiration — to celebrate the season in safe, fun, unexpected ways!  (source) The CDC recommends these lower risk activities can be safe alternatives: Carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household and displaying them Carving or decorating pumpkins outside, at a safe distance, with neighbors or friends Decorating your house, apartment, or living space Doing a Halloween scavenger hunt where children are given lists of Halloween-themed things to look for while they walk outdoors from house to house admiring Halloween decorations at a distance Having a virtual Halloween costume contest Having a Halloween movie night with people you live with Having a scavenger hunt-style trick-or-treat search with your household members in or around your home rather than going house to house Join data2insight as we celebrate Halloween in a COVID-19 free way.  ...

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19 Oct Celebrating National Business Women’s Week

Did you know the third full week in October ushers in National Business Women’s Week each year.  (source) Lean Madesin Phillips, president of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs (NFBPWC), launched the first National Business Women’s Week in 1928. It wasn’t until 1938 that the week was officially recognized and celebrated every year since. Since its creation in 1928, the NBWW has been sponsored by Business and Professional Women to recognize and honor the achievements of working women throughout history. BPW members and BPW Foundation call attention to the leadership of working women and local women entrepreneurs, facilitate discussions on the needs of working women, share information about successful workplace policies and raise awareness of resources available for women in their communities. NBWW is celebrated by BPW Local Organizations and their local communities across the country. The National Business Women’s Week is a salute to the achievements of all working women. Join data2insight as we celebrate National Business Women's Week!...

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12 Oct Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Indigenous Peoples' Day is a holiday that celebrates and honors Native American peoples and commemorates their histories and cultures. To date, 14 states— Alabama, Alaska, Hawai'i, Idaho, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin—and the District of Columbia, more than 130 cities, and growing numbers of school districts celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of or in addition to Columbus Day. Here are my top five suggestions for engaging with the spirit of Indigenous Peoples’ Day during this unusual year from the National Museum of the American Indian. Plant Native! Native plants support healthy ecosystems. Read an Indigenous writer. Consider reading a board book with the youngest in your family. Social Justice Books, a project of Teaching for Change, shares a list of books recommended by Dr. Debbie Reese (Nambé Pueblo), founder and co-editor of American Indians in Children’s Literature. Attend an online Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration. Monday, October 12, at 1 p.m. Eastern time, the museum is streaming an Indigenous Peoples’ Day program for middle- and high-school students, though all are welcome. Help teach a more truthful history of Columbus and the Indigenous peoples of the Caribbean Islands. A Washington, D.C., preschool teacher shared this lesson, which uses puppets to teach three- and four-year-olds about empathy and different perspectives in age-appropriate ways. Learn more by visiting Native Knowledge 360°, and advocate for Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Native Knowledge 360°, the museum’s National Education Initiative, is working to transform teaching and learning about American Indians. Join data2insight as we celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day!...

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05 Oct data2insight Stands with NAME

NAME is a non-profit organization that advances and advocates for equity and social justice through multicultural education.  The Founders of NAME envisioned an organization that would bring together individuals and groups with an interest in multicultural education from all levels of education, different academic disciplines and from diverse educational institutions and occupations. NAME provided their assessment of the President's September 22 executive order.  In the assessment, NAME states, "it is only when real diversity and inclusion training confronts the painful and awful history of the United States to challenge racism, sexism, homophobia and related forms of oppression that there is even a glimmer of hope that social justice, equity, and real change now and in the future are possible."  Trump’s order aims to eliminate any “discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological distress.” We hope that you stand with data2insight as we work with and urge educational communities to rise up and ignore the ban.  We encourage all the members of our community to vote on November 3 to uphold and advance racial and social justice....

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28 Sep Think Positive!!!

In a continuation of Positive Thinking Day, data2insight would like to share more positivity. Positive thinking is an emotional and mental attitude that focuses on the good and expects results that will benefit you. It’s about anticipating happiness, health and success – essentially, training yourself to adopt an abundance mindset and cultivate gratitude for your own successes and those of others. (source) How important is the power of positive thinking? It can make or break an individual.  The power of positive thinking can’t be understated.  (source) Join data2insight as we spread positivity!  Here are some additional quotes to share for positive thinking....

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