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22 Feb Celebrating Black History Month (4 of 4)

The New York Times recently wrote an article titled, "Honor and Learn This Black History Month." Data2insight found this article to be enlightening and encouraging.  We share a snippet from the article below and hope you will click here to read it in its entirety! More than ever, this month is a welcome time for the education and celebration of Black American culture. It’s not an understatement to describe the events of the past year as historic, and particularly for Black Americans. The nation elected its first Black vice president, a woman and a graduate of a historically Black university, and Georgia send its first Black senator to the Capitol. (Both of these realities were possible through the tireless organizing efforts of women like Stacey Abrams of Fair Fight and LaTosha Brown of Black Voters Matter.) This period also had Black Americans experiencing disproportionate deaths and job losses from Covid-19, police brutality and myriad race-fueled attacks. The killing of George Floyd, a Black man in police custody, ushered in a period of collective reckoning — one that prompted widespread protests, a push for racial justice and a re-examination of the education system’s failure to teach the accurate history of Black and Indigenous people. As Black History Month kicks off, there may not be a physical coming together, but there are numerous cultural events in which to take part. Join data2insight as we continue to Honor and Learn This Black History Month....

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15 Feb Celebrating Black History Month (3 of 4)

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH®) is the premier Black Heritage learned society with a strong network of national and international branches and partners.  The mission of the ASALH® is to promote, research, preserve, interpret and disseminate information about Black life, history and culture to the global community. In September 2021, the ASALH will hold the 106th Annual Meeting and Conference.  The Academic Program Committee seeks a diverse slate of presenters and panels representing a variety of professional and institutional backgrounds, perspectives, and voices. They are interested in detailed, comprehensive, and descriptive proposals that outline the theme, scope, and aim of participants. The committee particularly seeks presentations that probe the traditional fields of economic, political, intellectual, and cultural history; the established fields of urban, race, ethnic, labor, and women’s/gender history as well as southern and western history; along with the rapidly expanding fields of sexuality, LGBT, and queer history; environmental and public history; African American intellectual history; literature; and the social sciences. They encourage proposals from scholars working across a variety of temporal, geographical, thematic, and topical areas in Black history, life and culture. They seek to foster a space of inclusion in the ASALH program and encourage submissions from anyone interested in presenting including: historians, students, new professionals, first-time presenters, activists, and practitioners from allied professions. Review this frequently asked questions link for more information.  Want to submit your work?  Click here for more details! Join data2insight as we continue to expand our knowledge and understanding while celebrating Black History Month!...

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08 Feb Celebrating Black History Month (2 of 4)

Black History Month is an annual celebration of achievements by African Americans and a time for recognizing their central role in U.S. history. Also known as African American History Month, the event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Other countries around the world, including Canada and the United Kingdom, also devote a month to celebrating Black history. (source) Since 1976, every American president has designated February as Black History Month and endorsed a specific theme.  The Black History Month 2021 theme, “Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity” explores the African diaspora, and the spread of Black families across the United States. (source) The National Archives Museum Online will be holding an online panel discussion about this year's theme.  To learn more about this event and how you can register, please click here. Join data2insight as we celebrate Black History Month this year!...

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01 Feb Celebrating Black History Month (1 of 4)

Data2insight is looking forward to celebrating and learning this February for Black History Month.  While there are many sources available to find events and ways to celebrate, we are going to share some specific items this month to help you on your journey. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture is offering a wide range of digital programs for all ages this February. The month kicks off Feb. 2 with a book discussion with authors and scholars Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain on their newly released book Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619–2019, a 10-part book spanning 400 years of African American history. In this discussion moderated by Mary Elliott, the museum’s curator of American slavery, Kendi and Blain will focus on slavery, reconstruction and segregation and their continuing impact on the United States. They will be joined by several contributors to the book, including Herb Boyd, City University of New York; Kali Nicole Gross, Emory University; Peniel Joseph, University of Texas; and Annette Gordon Reed, Harvard University. (source) The museum’s Black History Month celebration also features the digital return of one of its signature programs, A Seat at the Table, an interactive program for participants to consider challenging questions about race, identity and economic justice over a meal. The February session will cover race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States. (source) Other programs include the third installment of the museum’s popular education series, “Artists at Home,” for students grades six–12; a new children’s program series based on the museum’s newest Joyful ABC’s activity book series; and a discussion about race and medicine with educators from the museum and the National Portrait Gallery. (source) Join data2insight as we look at the various offerings by the Smithsonian here....

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25 Jan Support Your Neighbors in Time of Coronavirus

Coronavirus is the perfect storm for our neighbors trying to make ends meet. As the pandemic continues, we are committed to ensuring everyone has the food they need during this difficult time. Feeding America is the largest charitable food assistance network working with 200 food banks and 60,000 food partners across the United States.  The majority of network food banks report seeing a record increase in the number of people needing help, with an average increase of 60% across the country. (source) Data2insight has team members in 9 different cities across the country. To kick off the new year, we made a donation to the following food banks in honor of the generous spirits of each of our 9 team members: Northwest Harvest in Seattle, WA Gleaners Community Food Bank in Detroit, MI Dulles Soup Kitchen in Chantilly, VA Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry in St. Louis, MO Food Bank of the Rockies in Denver, CO San Francisco-Marin Food Bank in San Francisco, CA NNEMAP Food Pantry in Columbus, OH Los Angeles Food Bank in Los Angeles, CA Yakima Rotary Food Bank in Yakima, WA Join data2insight by donating to a food bank near you!...

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18 Jan Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

On January 18, the entire nation pauses in remembrance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday that takes place on the third Monday of each January (source). The Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday celebrates the life and legacy of a man who brought hope and healing to America.  We commemorate as well the timeless values he taught us through his example — the values of courage, truth, justice, compassion, dignity, humility and service that so radiantly defined Dr. King’s character and empowered his leadership.  On this holiday, we commemorate the universal, unconditional love, forgiveness, and nonviolence that empowered his revolutionary spirit. We commemorate Dr. King’s inspiring words, because his voice and his vision filled a great void in our nation, and answered our collective longing to become a country that truly lived by its noblest principles. Read more...

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11 Jan Science Events to Watch for in 2021

In 2020, the world saw many events that led to questions about our future.  Now, we are looking to see what great things will happen in 2021. Nature.com pulled together an article that discusses more in depth some of the science-y things to keep an eye out for in 2021.  They include: Climate comeback - A key moment for climate negotiations will come at the United Nations’ climate conference in Glasgow, UK, in November. COVID detectives - A key moment for climate negotiations will come at the United Nations’ climate conference in Glasgow, UK, in November. Vaccines and pandemic - The effectiveness of several new vaccines will become clearer in early 2021. Open access drive - More than 20 organizations, including Welcome in London, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, and Dutch national funder NWO, will from January start stipulating that scholarly papers published from the work they fund must be immediately free to read. Stem-cell revamp - Stem-cell scientists will be eagerly awaiting updated guidelines for research from the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). Crunch time for Alzheimer's drug - US regulators are slated to decide whether the first drug reported to slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease can be used as a treatment. Mars gets busy - China’s ambitious agenda for space science continues in 2021. Long-awaited telescope launch - October will see the long-awaited launch of the James Webb Space Telescope — which its developer, NASA, calls the “largest, most powerful and complex space telescope ever built”. Ripple effect - Radio astronomers could be on the verge of demonstrating a new way of detecting gravitational waves by harnessing pulsating neutron stars as beacons. Join data2insight as we look forward to exciting Science Events in 2021!...

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28 Dec December Holidays Around the World, part 4 or 4

As the fourth and final installment of the 2020 December Holidays Around the World series, data2insight wishes you a happy new year. New Year’s Eve (31 December).  New Year’s Eve celebrations will be far less raucous this year because of the Covid-19 pandemic.  However, many will undoubtedly be happy to see the back of 2020 and welcome in 2021, particularly with the possibility of a vaccine on the horizon.  (source). Here are some interesting facts about how New Year's is celebrated around the world (source): In Ecuador, families dress a straw man in old clothes on December 31. The straw man represents the old year. The family members make a will for the straw man that lists all of their faults. At midnight, they burn the straw man, in hopes that their faults will disappear with him. In Japan, Omisoka (or New Year’s Eve) is the second most important holiday of the year, following New Year’s Day, the start of a new beginning. Japanese families gather for a late dinner around 11 PM, and at midnight, many make visits to a shrine or temple. In many homes, there is a cast bell that is struck 108 times, symbolizing desires believed to cause human suffering. Those in Hong Kong pray to the gods and ghosts of their ancestors, asking that they will fulfill wishes for the next year. Priests read aloud the names of every living person at the celebration and attach a list of the names to a paper horse and set it on fire. The smoke carries the names up to the gods and the living will be remembered. To celebrate the Chinese New Year, many children dress in new clothes to celebrate and people carry lanterns and join in a huge parade led by a silk dragon, the Chinese symbol of strength. According to legend, the dragon hibernates most of the year, so people throw firecrackers to keep the dragon awake. Join data2insight as we celebrate the end of 2020 and the beginning of 2021!...

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14 Dec December Holidays Around the World, part 2 of 4

Most of the world celebrate Christmas on December 25.  However, did you know that there are many other global holidays celebrated in December as well?  This month, data2insight will be highlighting a few of those holidays. Festivus (23 December).  Festivus entered popular culture in 1997 thanks to the Seinfeld episode “The Strike”. The parody holiday is a resistance to the consumerism of Christmas, and is celebrated by standing around an unadorned aluminum pole, as opposed to a decorated tree.  Traditions include the “airing of grievances” and “feats of strength”, while people also make reference to “Festivus miracles”, which are actually easily-explainable events. (source) Christmas (25 December).  Most of the world celebrates Christmas on 25 December, marking the birth of Jesus Christ. This date was picked because it corresponded with winter solstice in the Roman calendar. In actuality, the date of Jesus’ birth is unknown. Some people celebrate Christmas on the 24th, and certain cultures even celebrate in January. People give gifts, shares feasts with family and decorate trees in their homes.  (source) Join data2insight as we continue to learn about the holidays around the world and how they are celebrated....

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07 Dec December Holidays Around the World, part 1 of 4

Most of the world celebrate Christmas on December 25.  However, did you know that there are many other global holidays celebrated in December as well?  This month, data2insight will be highlighting a few of those holidays. Hanukkah.  This year, Hanukkah starts on December 10 and runs through December 18, traditionally happening on the 25th day of the month of Kislev on the Jewish calendar.  Hanukkah is an eight-day celebration of a story of miraculous provision. Each night, another candle is lit on the menorah, and sometimes gifts are exchanged at the same time. (source)   Learn more about Hanukkah here. Yule.  This holiday runs December 21 through January 1.  Yule, also known as Yuletide, a holiday with over a millennium of history and traditions, much of which formed the basis of what many know today as Christmas traditions. (source)  It has spawned a number of Christmas traditions, such as the yule log.  (source)  Yule is set to start on the day of the winter solstice. (source)  Learn more about Yule here. Join data2insight as we continue to learn about the holidays around the world and how they are celebrated....

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