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27 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

The Center for Asian Pacific American Women (CAPAW) is the Premier Organization Developing AAPI Women to be impactful and influential leaders. It is a national, nonprofit organization dedicated to the enhancement and enrichment of leadership skills for Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women through education, networking, and mentorship. The Center strives to nurture our Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities by expanding leadership capacity, fostering awareness of AAPI issues, creating a supportive network of AAPI women leaders, and strengthening community. Learn more about the history of CAPAW here....

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20 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015) (top picture).  Conside red the eldest human rights activist of our time, Boggs was a philosopher who fought for women’s rights, environmental justice, Black power (alongside Angela Davis and Malcolm X), and labor rights. Married to African American activist James Boggs, she wrote a series of books and was involved in many community efforts that ranged from advocating against poor living conditions in Chicago to creating charter schools and youth programs in Detroit. (source) Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) Often called the “First Lady of Physics” and the “Chinese Marie Curie,” Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu made a name for herself as one of history’s most renowned physicists. Born in China in 1912, Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkley in 1940. After teaching physics for a couple of years at Princeton University and Smith College, Wu joined the Manhattan Project at Columbia University in New York, a nuclear research program that helped the United States develop the atomic bomb during World War II. After the war, Wu stayed on at Columbia and became the foremost authority on beta decay (aka radioactive disintegration). Then, in 1956, two of Wu’s male colleagues asked her help in testing a theory they came up with that challenged the Law of Conservation of Parity during beta decay. Wu’s innovative experiments proved the men’s theory, and they won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1957. Well, the men did, anyway. Sadly, similar to the experiences of many extraordinary women in science before her (and still today), Wu’s role in this scientific breakthrough went unacknowledged and uncredited. But despite the science community’s failure to recognize her considerable talents as Nobel Prize-winning, Wu continued to make cutting-edge contributions to the field of physics throughout her career. She even won some prizes of her own, including the National Medal of Science, the Comstock Prize, and and 1978’s Wolf Prize in Physics. And today, her book Beta Decay, written in 1956, remains nuclear physicists’ go-to reference guide on the subject.  (source)...

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13 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

Reshma Saujani is the Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code.  She began her career as an attorney and activist. In 2010, she surged onto the political scene as the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. During the race, Reshma visited local schools and saw the gender gap in computing classes firsthand, which led her to start Girls Who Code. Reshma has also served as Deputy Public Advocate for New York City and ran a spirited campaign for Public Advocate in 2013. For more information, check out this site....

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06 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America’s history and are instrumental in its future success. (source) It is a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian/Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island). The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants. Learn more about Asian/Pacific American Heritage month here....

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29 Apr #MathStatMonth

April marks a time to increase the understanding and appreciation of mathematics and statistics. (source) Why? Both subjects play a significant role in addressing many real-world problems--internet security, sustainability, disease, climate change, the data deluge, and much more. Research in these and other areas is ongoing, revealing new results and applications every day in fields such as medicine, manufacturing, energy, biotechnology, and business. Mathematics and statistics are important drivers of innovation in our technological world, in which new systems and methodologies continue to become more complex. (source) On Saturday, May 4, 2019, there is a free National Math Festival being held in Washington, D.C.  This free and public celebration has program tracks for adults, middle and high schoolers, as well as elementary schoolers and the very young.  Explore playful and accessible lectures on the math behind how the world works. Enjoy creative short films, dance and musical performances, a magic show, team sports challenges, hands-on art making, puzzles, games, demos, and more! (source) The 2019 National Math Festival is organized by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) in cooperation with the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) and the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath). Learn more about our organizations below. Join data2insight as we celebrate Mathematics and Statistics Awareness month! #MathStatMonth...

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22 Apr Happy Earth Day!

This year, National Environmental Education Week is kicked off on April 22, 2019, Earth Day! The Earth Day Network is asking people to join our Protect Our Species Earth Day campaign to: Educate and raise awareness about the accelerating rate of extinction of millions of species and the causes and consequences of this phenomenon. Achieve major policy victories that protect broad groups of species as well as individual species and their habitats. Build and activate a global movement that embraces nature and its values. Encourage individual actions such as adopting plant based diet and stopping pesticide and herbicide use. NEEF’s National Environmental Education Week is the nation's largest celebration of environmental education (also known as EE). NEEF partners with educators, students, government agencies, businesses, communities, nonprofit organizations, and others to inspire environmental learning and encourage stewardship of our essential resources: land, air, and water. NEEF is launching the updated “Greening STEM” toolkit, which helps educators use the natural environment and real-world challenges to engage learners and deliver high-quality STEM education. We will also have updated educational EE resources, infographics, and reading lists. Learn more or get more resources at the Earth Day Resources page. Join data2insight as we work towards protecting our species and getting a great start to National Environmental Education Week!...

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15 Apr Celebrating National Women’s History Month with a Historic Victory!

In November, HRC-endorsed Kyrsten Sinema became the next Senator from the great state of Arizona!  She is the first openly bisexual person to serve in the Senate. This is huge! LGBTQ voters turned out in force in key House, Senate, and state races nationwide.  Not only was it a blue wave — it was a rainbow wave. Our new congress reflects the people they represent more than ever before. Across the country, we endorsed more than 480 diverse pro-equality candidates in 44 states, and deployed over 150 staff to 23 states. We knocked on tens of thousands of doors, including 12,000 in the final four days. Our priorities focused on six states including Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nevada, and Arizona — and our candidates for Senate won in ALL SIX! This includes LGBTQ pioneer Tammy Baldwin and the only two pro-equality pickups nationwide — Jacky Rosen and of course Kyrsten Sinema. Senator-elect Sinema now joins the over 150 LGBTQ candidates elected in November — in fact, she has now doubled our representation in the Senate! What an incredible, historic moment for our movement. This is what happens when LGBTQ people and our allies mobilize, organize and turn out.(source) Join data2insight as we send our congratulations to Senator Sinema!...

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08 Apr National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME+) Released

A must read for educators, administrators, and all STEM education stakeholders. The 2018 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education, first conducted in 1977, identifies trends in science and mathematics and provides key data about the characteristics of the mathematics, science, and (starting this year) computer science teaching force; commonly used textbooks and programs and how they are used; influences on teachers' decisions about content and pedagogy; formal and informal professional learning opportunities; and how resources are distributed among schools. (source) For more information, check out this site.  ...

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01 Apr Finishing up Celebrating Women’s National History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, which was last month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the past who were recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Peace Pilgrim, Spiritual Leader and Peace Activist.  Peace Pilgrim was a non-denominational spiritual leader, pacifist, and vegetarian activist. In 1953 she started a cross country personal pilgrimage for peace. She stopped counting miles in 1962 when she marked 25,000 miles and was on her seventh cross country march when she died in 1981. Mary Burnett Talbert, Anti-lynching activist, Orator, and Suffragist.  Mary Burnett Talbert was a founder of both the Niagara Movement in 1905 and its successor the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1910. It was through the NAACP that Mary Talbert became a leader in the anti-lynching movement. Talbert and the Anti-Lynching Crusaders publicized the horrors of lynching and provided a focus for campaign fundraising....

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25 Mar Celebrating Women’s National History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the past who will be recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Elise Boulding, Creator of Peace and Conflict Studies.  Elise Boulding, a Quaker sociologist and author, was a major contributor to the development of the field of Peace and Conflict Studies. Among her core theories of peace were the theory of peace as an everyday practice (rather than a dull static state), that strong families cultivate a peace culture, that women as mothers have a great influence in setting the foundation for peace, that all children could be co-creators of a peaceful future, and that building a global civic culture is a first step to ending world conflicts. Sarah Brady, Gun control Advocate.  Sarah Brady became active in the gun control movement in the 1980s after her husband was permanently disabled in the failed assassination attempt on President Reagan. She was the most visible gun control activist of her time and was instrumental in the passage of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, more commonly known as the Brady Bill, in 1993. In 2000 Handgun Control Inc was renamed the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and Sarah Brady was appointed chairwoman, where she served until her death in 2015. Dorothy Cotton, Civil Rights, Activist.  Dorothy Cotton was the only woman in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s inner circle and one of the most influential women in the civil rights movement. She developed the Citizen Education Program, teaching disenfranchised people the importance of political participation and methods of nonviolent protest.  She fearlessly faced off with Klu Klux Klansman who frequently violently disrupted civil rights demonstrations. Her book If Your Back’s Not Bent: the Role of the Citizen Education Program in the Civil Rights Movement was published in 2012....

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