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15 Apr Celebrating National Women’s History Month with a Historic Victory!

In November, HRC-endorsed Kyrsten Sinema became the next Senator from the great state of Arizona!  She is the first openly bisexual person to serve in the Senate. This is huge! LGBTQ voters turned out in force in key House, Senate, and state races nationwide.  Not only was it a blue wave — it was a rainbow wave. Our new congress reflects the people they represent more than ever before. Across the country, we endorsed more than 480 diverse pro-equality candidates in 44 states, and deployed over 150 staff to 23 states. We knocked on tens of thousands of doors, including 12,000 in the final four days. Our priorities focused on six states including Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nevada, and Arizona — and our candidates for Senate won in ALL SIX! This includes LGBTQ pioneer Tammy Baldwin and the only two pro-equality pickups nationwide — Jacky Rosen and of course Kyrsten Sinema. Senator-elect Sinema now joins the over 150 LGBTQ candidates elected in November — in fact, she has now doubled our representation in the Senate! What an incredible, historic moment for our movement. This is what happens when LGBTQ people and our allies mobilize, organize and turn out.(source) Join data2insight as we send our congratulations to Senator Sinema!...

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08 Apr National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME+) Released

A must read for educators, administrators, and all STEM education stakeholders. The 2018 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education, first conducted in 1977, identifies trends in science and mathematics and provides key data about the characteristics of the mathematics, science, and (starting this year) computer science teaching force; commonly used textbooks and programs and how they are used; influences on teachers' decisions about content and pedagogy; formal and informal professional learning opportunities; and how resources are distributed among schools. (source) For more information, check out this site.  ...

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01 Apr Finishing up Celebrating Women’s National History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, which was last month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the past who were recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Peace Pilgrim, Spiritual Leader and Peace Activist.  Peace Pilgrim was a non-denominational spiritual leader, pacifist, and vegetarian activist. In 1953 she started a cross country personal pilgrimage for peace. She stopped counting miles in 1962 when she marked 25,000 miles and was on her seventh cross country march when she died in 1981. Mary Burnett Talbert, Anti-lynching activist, Orator, and Suffragist.  Mary Burnett Talbert was a founder of both the Niagara Movement in 1905 and its successor the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1910. It was through the NAACP that Mary Talbert became a leader in the anti-lynching movement. Talbert and the Anti-Lynching Crusaders publicized the horrors of lynching and provided a focus for campaign fundraising....

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25 Mar Celebrating Women’s National History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the past who will be recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Elise Boulding, Creator of Peace and Conflict Studies.  Elise Boulding, a Quaker sociologist and author, was a major contributor to the development of the field of Peace and Conflict Studies. Among her core theories of peace were the theory of peace as an everyday practice (rather than a dull static state), that strong families cultivate a peace culture, that women as mothers have a great influence in setting the foundation for peace, that all children could be co-creators of a peaceful future, and that building a global civic culture is a first step to ending world conflicts. Sarah Brady, Gun control Advocate.  Sarah Brady became active in the gun control movement in the 1980s after her husband was permanently disabled in the failed assassination attempt on President Reagan. She was the most visible gun control activist of her time and was instrumental in the passage of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, more commonly known as the Brady Bill, in 1993. In 2000 Handgun Control Inc was renamed the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and Sarah Brady was appointed chairwoman, where she served until her death in 2015. Dorothy Cotton, Civil Rights, Activist.  Dorothy Cotton was the only woman in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s inner circle and one of the most influential women in the civil rights movement. She developed the Citizen Education Program, teaching disenfranchised people the importance of political participation and methods of nonviolent protest.  She fearlessly faced off with Klu Klux Klansman who frequently violently disrupted civil rights demonstrations. Her book If Your Back’s Not Bent: the Role of the Citizen Education Program in the Civil Rights Movement was published in 2012....

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18 Mar Celebrating National Women’s History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the present who will be recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Dr. E. Faye Williams, President/CEO of the National Congress of Black Women.  Dr. E. Faye Williams, Esq. has made her biggest mark as an activist for peace and human rights, having traveled and worked on issues around the world. In her book, The Peace Terrorists, she details a 40-day peace mission she undertook with 200 women from around the world for the purpose of working to prevent the first Gulf War. As an active civil and human rights leader, she continues to fearlessly protest injustice and brutal world-wide occupations. She is currently the National Chair of the National Congress of Black Women. Sister Alice Zachmann, Founder and former Director of the Guatemala Human Rights Commission USA.  Sister Alice Zachman has dedicated her life to ending war and violence, from advocating an end to the Vietnam War to supporting the United Farm Workers. She founded the Guatemala Human Rights Commission USA in 1982 and served as director for 20 years, fearlessly supporting Guatemalan survivors of torture and abuse, as well as working to end U.S. military assistance to Guatemala. Zachmann is a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame Central Pacific Province....

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11 Mar Celebrating Women’s National History Month

In honor of Women’s National History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the present who will be recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Graciela Sanchez, Co-founder and Director of the Esperanza Peace & Justice Center.  Graciela Sanchez is a dedicated neighborhood activist and cultural worker. She is co-founded and director of the Esperanza Peace and Justice Center (San Antonio, TX). The Esperanza is a community-based arts and cultural organization, committed to serving marginalized communities.  Her activism facilitates conversations on issues of colonization, cultural genocide, violence, and intersectionality. Deborah Tucker, President of the Board of Directors of the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence.  Deborah D. Tucker has dedicated over 40 years to ending violence. She founded and led several organizations while working with many to advocate for improvements to laws, polices, and practices at the local, state, national, and international levels. Most notably, she helped write and pass the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 and co-chaired the Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. Tucker is currently President of the Board of Directors of the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence....

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04 Mar Celebrating Women’s National History Month

This year’s theme for National Women’s History Month is Visionary Women: Champions of Peace & Nonviolence to honor women who have led efforts to end war, violence, and injustice and pioneered the use of nonviolence to change society. In honor of Women’s National History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals of the present who will be recognized at the National Women’s History Alliance event on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the Hamilton Restaurant in Washington, DC. (source) Kathy Kelly, Co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence.  She is a peace activist, pacifist, and author, one of the founding members of Voices in the Wilderness, and currently a co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Kelly’s recent work has focused on Afghanistan and Gaza and protesting US drone policy. Zainab Salbi, Founder and Former CEO of Women for Women International.  At the age of 23, Salbi founded Women for Women International, a grassroots humanitarian and development organization dedicated to serving women survivors of wars by offering support, tools, and access to life-changing skills to move from crisis and poverty to stability and economic self-sufficiency. Salbi is host of the #Me Too, Now What series on PBS....

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25 Feb Celebrating Black STEM Innovators Who Have Defined Our Modern World

In honor of Black History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals, past and present, who should be routinely recognized for their achievements. (source) Shirley Ann Jackson, Physicist & President of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Few people have a resume as impressive as Shirley Ann Jackson. She was the first woman to receive a doctorate from MIT in any field, studied subatomic particles during the 1970s, was appointed by Bill Clinton to serve as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (becoming the first woman and first African American to hold the position), and became the 18th president of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the oldest technological research university in the United States(again, becoming the first woman and first African American to hold the position). (source) Since 1999, Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson has led an extraordinary transformation of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York and Hartford, Connecticut into a world-class technological research university. Rankings for Rensselaer among national universities have risen substantially under Dr. Jackson's tenure, and the number of students applying to join the freshman class has tripled. (source)...

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18 Feb Celebrating Black STEM Innovators Who Have Defined Our Modern World

In honor of Black History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals, past and present, who should be routinely recognized for their achievements. (source) Marie M. Daly, Chemist Marie Daly helped us understand how the body works. Growing up, her family pushed her to succeed in school, leading Daly to receive degrees in STEM subjects from Queens College and New York University. She then went to Columbia to complete her doctorate degree, becoming the first African American woman in the country to get a PhD in chemistry. After graduating, Daly began researching the connection between high cholesterol and clogged arteries. Her innovative findings helped start a conversation within the medical community about how a person’s diet can affect heart health and the circulatory system. Daly was also an activist who dedicated much of her time to supporting students of color in STEM fields. She even created a scholarship fund in memory of her dad. (source)...

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04 Feb Celebrating Black STEM Innovators Who Have Defined Our Modern World

In honor of Black History Month, we wanted to highlight some of the individuals, past and present, who should be routinely recognized for their achievements. (source) Kimberly Bryant, Electrical Engineer & Founder of Black Girls Code Kimberly Bryant had worked for years as a successful electrical engineer before moving to the Bay Area. Once she made it to the heart of Silicon Valley, she noticed that minorities were severely underrepresented in the startup world. Coupled with the fact that her daughter, Kia, was sick of instructors focusing more on the boys (who outnumbered the handful of girls) at a programming camp, she knew she had to do something about it. In 2011, Bryant decided to create Black Girls Code, a nonprofit that empowers girls from underrepresented communities by introducing them to programming. While not as lucrative as her previous jobs, the positive influence from her nonprofit organization has already made an impact: girls who have participated in Black Girls Code have started clubs and are becoming leaders in their communities. (source)...

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