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24 Jun Celebrating Gay Pride Month

When Audrey Tang was just eight years old, she wrote a computer game to help her younger brother learn fractions. She began learning Perl at the age of 12, dropped out of high school, left Taiwan, and by 19 was hailed as an entrepreneur in Silicon Valley. Tang transitioned to a female gender role in 2005, and in 2016 became Taiwan’s youngest government minister — as well as Taiwan’s first transgender Cabinet member. Her ministry has spearheaded the island’s eight-year Digital Nation Plan, which the Cabinet expects to put Taiwan in the world’s top ten for information technology by 2025. (source) In a 2017 interview, Tang said, “I would say I’m just post-gender or post-genre, meaning that I don’t think there should be things that only one gender should do.” Join data2insight as we celebrate how Audrey breaks barriers and becomes among the top 100 Global Thinkers.  Learn more about Audrey in her own words....

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17 Jun Celebrating Gay Pride Month

Lynn Conway, born biologically male, invented a groundbreaking method for issuing multiple out-of-order instructions per machine cycle in supercomputers.  In the 1960s, she made possible the creation of the first true superscalar computer, and participated in its design at IBM, where she worked for years.  That is, until her firing in 1968, when she underwent gender reassignment surgery and transitioned to a female gender role.  She went on to rebuild her career from the ground up at Memorex, then Xerox, and beyond. In 1999, she made contact with a researcher looking into her early work at IBM (on “Project Y”) and reclaimed an essential part of her history and accomplishments. (source) In an interview, Conway said, “When I made the decision to have a gender-correction, everybody told me I was terrible, I was going to end up dead or in an asylum someplace.  But they were wrong.  I’ve had a great life, I’m very happy, and I’ve managed to do some productive, important work.” Join data2insight as we learn more about Lynn Conway here and here....

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10 Jun Celebrating Gay Pride Month

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan.  The Stonewall riots were a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States.  Today, celebrations include pride parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia and concerts, and LGBTQ Pride Month events attract millions of participants around the world.  Memorials are held during this month for those members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS.  The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots....

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03 Jun Data2insight Out and About!

This week, data2insight founder, Veronica Smith, is looking forward to attending both the 2019 Seattle AWIS Banquet and the WIBLI Awards 2019 event. At the 2019 Seattle AWIS Banquet, Veronica and her wife, Natalie Hamrick, are looking forward to awarding the Smith-Hamrick scholarship to a promising undergraduate student studying science and support the student achieving their career goals.  They also look forward to  hearing from the inspiring award winners. On Thursday this week, Veronica will be attending the Women in Business & Leadership Initiative luncheon. This will be her first time attending this conference and she is super excited to be checking it out. If you are in the area, stop by one of these events, say hello, and join data2insight in supporting these amazing events....

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27 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

The Center for Asian Pacific American Women (CAPAW) is the Premier Organization Developing AAPI Women to be impactful and influential leaders. It is a national, nonprofit organization dedicated to the enhancement and enrichment of leadership skills for Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women through education, networking, and mentorship. The Center strives to nurture our Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities by expanding leadership capacity, fostering awareness of AAPI issues, creating a supportive network of AAPI women leaders, and strengthening community. Learn more about the history of CAPAW here....

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20 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015) (top picture).  Conside red the eldest human rights activist of our time, Boggs was a philosopher who fought for women’s rights, environmental justice, Black power (alongside Angela Davis and Malcolm X), and labor rights. Married to African American activist James Boggs, she wrote a series of books and was involved in many community efforts that ranged from advocating against poor living conditions in Chicago to creating charter schools and youth programs in Detroit. (source) Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) Often called the “First Lady of Physics” and the “Chinese Marie Curie,” Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu made a name for herself as one of history’s most renowned physicists. Born in China in 1912, Wu received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkley in 1940. After teaching physics for a couple of years at Princeton University and Smith College, Wu joined the Manhattan Project at Columbia University in New York, a nuclear research program that helped the United States develop the atomic bomb during World War II. After the war, Wu stayed on at Columbia and became the foremost authority on beta decay (aka radioactive disintegration). Then, in 1956, two of Wu’s male colleagues asked her help in testing a theory they came up with that challenged the Law of Conservation of Parity during beta decay. Wu’s innovative experiments proved the men’s theory, and they won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1957. Well, the men did, anyway. Sadly, similar to the experiences of many extraordinary women in science before her (and still today), Wu’s role in this scientific breakthrough went unacknowledged and uncredited. But despite the science community’s failure to recognize her considerable talents as Nobel Prize-winning, Wu continued to make cutting-edge contributions to the field of physics throughout her career. She even won some prizes of her own, including the National Medal of Science, the Comstock Prize, and and 1978’s Wolf Prize in Physics. And today, her book Beta Decay, written in 1956, remains nuclear physicists’ go-to reference guide on the subject.  (source)...

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13 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

Reshma Saujani is the Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code.  She began her career as an attorney and activist. In 2010, she surged onto the political scene as the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. During the race, Reshma visited local schools and saw the gender gap in computing classes firsthand, which led her to start Girls Who Code. Reshma has also served as Deputy Public Advocate for New York City and ran a spirited campaign for Public Advocate in 2013. For more information, check out this site....

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06 May Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America’s history and are instrumental in its future success. (source) It is a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian/Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island). The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants. Learn more about Asian/Pacific American Heritage month here....

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29 Apr #MathStatMonth

April marks a time to increase the understanding and appreciation of mathematics and statistics. (source) Why? Both subjects play a significant role in addressing many real-world problems--internet security, sustainability, disease, climate change, the data deluge, and much more. Research in these and other areas is ongoing, revealing new results and applications every day in fields such as medicine, manufacturing, energy, biotechnology, and business. Mathematics and statistics are important drivers of innovation in our technological world, in which new systems and methodologies continue to become more complex. (source) On Saturday, May 4, 2019, there is a free National Math Festival being held in Washington, D.C.  This free and public celebration has program tracks for adults, middle and high schoolers, as well as elementary schoolers and the very young.  Explore playful and accessible lectures on the math behind how the world works. Enjoy creative short films, dance and musical performances, a magic show, team sports challenges, hands-on art making, puzzles, games, demos, and more! (source) The 2019 National Math Festival is organized by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) in cooperation with the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) and the National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath). Learn more about our organizations below. Join data2insight as we celebrate Mathematics and Statistics Awareness month! #MathStatMonth...

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22 Apr Happy Earth Day!

This year, National Environmental Education Week is kicked off on April 22, 2019, Earth Day! The Earth Day Network is asking people to join our Protect Our Species Earth Day campaign to: Educate and raise awareness about the accelerating rate of extinction of millions of species and the causes and consequences of this phenomenon. Achieve major policy victories that protect broad groups of species as well as individual species and their habitats. Build and activate a global movement that embraces nature and its values. Encourage individual actions such as adopting plant based diet and stopping pesticide and herbicide use. NEEF’s National Environmental Education Week is the nation's largest celebration of environmental education (also known as EE). NEEF partners with educators, students, government agencies, businesses, communities, nonprofit organizations, and others to inspire environmental learning and encourage stewardship of our essential resources: land, air, and water. NEEF is launching the updated “Greening STEM” toolkit, which helps educators use the natural environment and real-world challenges to engage learners and deliver high-quality STEM education. We will also have updated educational EE resources, infographics, and reading lists. Learn more or get more resources at the Earth Day Resources page. Join data2insight as we work towards protecting our species and getting a great start to National Environmental Education Week!...

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