The Science of Color: Black and Brown Girls in STEM

26 Feb The Science of Color: Black and Brown Girls in STEM

If current statistics provide any indication, the idea of black and brown girls in STEM seems far-fetched.  Look at any data report out there, and you’ll find that women remain underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math. (source)

In 2012, white women earned 6,777 PhDs in STEM fields.  On the other hand, white men earned 8,478 PhD degrees.  For African American women, that number dwindles to 684—10 times fewer scientific doctorates than their white counterparts.  With only 3.5% of STEM bachelor degrees, Latina women face an even larger obstacle. (source)

STEM fields show an absence of women of color.   The problem starts in childhood.  We need to encourage girls NOW so that they grow into smart, capable, and driven women who take their rightful place in the world of science, technology, engineering, and math. (source)

Teach your girls about people like Mae C. Jamison, the first African-American female astronaut (source); Dr. Alexa Candy, the first female African-American neurosurgeon in the United States (source); and Shirley Ann Jackson, the only African-American woman awarded the National Medal of Science (2014) (source).

Letting girls know early in life about African-American Women in Science can help encourage them to follow footsteps into the world of #STEM.

Join data2insight as we strive to continue the inspiration, encouragement, and support of black and brown girls in #STEM along with organizations like Girls Pursuing Science.